Reducing your water use by sorting leaks could save you money. Being onto it with leaks at your place will help take the pressure off our pumps and pipes so we can supply water to everyone and have enough in reserve to fight fires.

How to check for leaks

  1. Check your hot water cylinder, appliances and toilet cistern(s) for signs of a leak.
  2. Check for damp patches in the garden or driveway during dry weather.
  3. Listen for water hissing or the sound of running water when no water is being used across your property.
  4. Read your water meter to find out if water is flowing when no water is being used on your property.
  5. Contact a certified plumber to enquire about getting your leak fixed.

Water meters are usually located in a box in the ground on or near your front boundary. They are normally in a straight line between the road and your outside hose tap. The meter boxes come in many different shapes and sizes, both metal and plastic. There may be debris or vegetation covering the meter.

  • Once you have located your water meter, pick a time when no water will be used for at least four hours (e.g. overnight).
  •  Don’t turn off the tap on your water meter during the test. You need to be able to see if the meter dial still moves while you are not using water.
  • Read your water meter, then read it again after the period of not using any water (at least four hours later). 
  • Read all the numbers on the dial, including the red ones.
  • If your meter readings are different it means water is still flowing somewhere on your property and it is likely you have a leak.
  • If a leak is discovered on your property, it’s up to you to get this fixed as soon as possible. The Council is only responsible for pipes and fittings up to your property’s boundary.
  • Contact a certified plumber to enquire about getting your leak fixed.

If the dials stay the same then there is no leak. Reduce your use to avoid charges.

If there is a difference then there is a leak somewhere on your property.