Depending on their nature, scale and location, place-making projects may require landowner permission and some form of consent, licence or permit from the Council, often driven by legal requirements outside Council’s control.

If the project is not on your land, you will need permission from the landowner to go ahead.

This includes events on Council land, such as parks and streets, which may have conditions for events and other projects taking place on them.

A resource consent is a formal approval needed when an activity does not comply with the rules of the Christchurch District Plan, or the Plan states that a resource consent is required for that particular activity. The Plan does permit some temporary activities, buildings and events in specified circumstances.

While most building work will require a building consent under the Building Act 2004, some specified low-risk building work can be done without one. Always check with the Council to see if a building consent is required before starting any building work.

To find out whether your project requires a resource consent or a building consent, contact the Council on (03) 941 8999 to discuss it with a Duty Planner and/or Duty Building Consent Officer. If a resource and/or building consent is required, pre-application meetings are possible and encouraged. These provide an opportunity for you to discuss your proposed project and information requirements with relevant Council staff before lodging your application/s. Contact the Council on (03) 941 8686 or email CCGRegulatoryAdvice@ccc.govt.nz

For more information regarding resource and/or building consents (including how you can support someone else’s resource consent application), see:

Council approval is required for the closure and temporary use of legal road(external link) for street parties and other events, storage or fencing/hoarding.

Traffic Management Plan may also be required for any activity which varies the normal operating condition of a legal road, whether located inside or outside of the legal road.

For example, high generators of vehicular or pedestrian traffic, such as festivals, have the potential to adversely affect traffic flow and safety.

A licence or permit from the Council is required for business activities such as signage, trading in a public place and selling food and alcohol.

Information for safe food handling for community fundraising (e.g. sausage sizzles and cake stalls), events or special occasions can be found on the New Zealand Food Safety website(external link).