Residential, commercial and industrial land use activities and the daily consuming behavior of individuals all involve the use of natural resources.

Earthquake demolition waste is disposed of safely

The Christchurch earthquakes have produced a considerable amount of waste due to the deconstruction of buildings, structures, roads and underground infrastructure, as well as the silt generated as a result of liquefaction processes. 

Key points

  • Up to June 2016, 895,260 tonnes of earthquake demolition waste has gone to Burwood and Kate Valley landfills.
  • Of the total demolition waste that has been disposed of, 73% has gone to Burwood.
  • As the rebuild progresses, the amount of earthquake related demolition waste being taken to landfill is decreasing.

Total Earthquake Demolition Waste

Earthquake Waste graph

Source: Canterbury Waste


Demolition Waste to Burwood

Demolition Waste to Burwood graph

Source: Canterbury Waste


Demolition Waste to Kate Valley

Demolition Waste to Kate Valley graph

Source: Canterbury Waste


Cleanfill to Landfill

Cleanfill to Landfill graph

Source: Council, Water & Waste


More detail and information

Demolition Waste: Christchurch has had an unprecedented amount of construction and demolition waste to deal with following the region’s earthquakes. Burwood Resource Recovery Park was re-opened after the earthquakes in 2011 to handle demolition waste. 

Demolition Waste Approved Facilities: A list of approved facilities that are authorised to store, sort/process or dispose of demolition waste.

Natural Environment Recovery Programme: Environment Canterbury led the development of the Natural Environment Recovery Programme to facilitate the restoration and enhancement of the natural environment, and capture opportunities to build future resilience.

There is a reduction in waste

Economic growth, population levels, a booming demolition and construction industry, consumer packaging and higher levels of disposable income all impact on the amount of solid waste that ends up in landfills. Diverting as much waste as possible away from landfill is a key council priority. 

Key points

  • Since 2012, there have been significant increases in the amount of waste sent to landfill per capita. It is likely that a substantial proportion of this can be attributed to earthquake related demolition.
  • In 2015, the amount of general refuse being sent to landfill was the highest it has been, both pre and post-earthquake. There was a small decrease in 2016, however the amount of general refuse going to landfill is still well above both pre and post-earthquake levels
  • The introduction of the 3 bin rubbish and recycling system in 2009 resulted in green waste collected more than doubling to 70,000 tonnes and recycling peaking at 48,000 tonnes. Since then amounts have remained relatively constant.
  • Not surprisingly, since 2010 there have been substantial increases in the amount of cleanfill going to landfill. Between 2010 and 2015 the amount of construction and demolition cleanfill increased by 176%. It is however worth noting that 2010 was the lowest levels had been since 2004.

Waste to Landfill (Per Capita)

Waste to Landfill (Per Capita) graph

Source: Council, Water & Waste


General Refuse

General Refuse graph

Source: Council, Water & Waste


Recyclables

Recyclables graph

Source: Council, Water & Waste


Greenwaste

Greenwaste graph

Source: Council, Water & Waste


More detail and information

Waste Statistics: Statistics on rubbish collection in Christchurch.

Council Sustainability: Christchurch City Council is recognised, both in New Zealand and overseas, as a local authority committed to sustainable operations.

Water is used efficiently and sustainably

Water is an essential of life and we need to ensure we have access to good quality water forever. Part of ensuring the long-term sustainability of our water supply is ensuring we don't use more than is being naturally replaced. With many of the aquifers in other parts of Canterbury effectively over-allocated, we need to protect the security of the water sources we currently have.

Key points

  • Since 2001 water abstraction in the city has averaged around 52 million cubic metres per year. However, per capita extraction has decreased by around 11%. 
  • Although Banks Peninsula only uses 3% of the City's water, per capita it uses twice as much as the metropolitan part of the City.  Part of this may be due to people in holiday homes, who are not included in the usual resident population.
  • Between 2012 and 2015, the proportion of residents who feel they are aware of water conservation issues has declined. Awareness dropped from 91% in 2012 to 74% in 2015, whilst those who are unaware rose from 9% in 2012 to 25% in 2015.
  • By detecting leaks in the water supply network, it was hoped that leakage rates would return to no more than an average of 155 litres / connection / per day by 2020. In 2015, an average leakage rate of 134 litres / connection / per day was found, 14% lower than the 2020 target. 

Total Water Abstraction Christchurch & Banks Peninsula

Total Water Abstraction Christchurch & Banks Peninsula graph

Source: Council, Water & Waste


Water Abstraction Per Capita

Water Abstraction Per Capita graph

Source: Council, Water & Waste


Average Daily Consumption

Average Daily Consumption graph

Source: Council, Water & Waste


Awareness of Water Conservation

Awareness of Water Conservation graph

Source: Council, Annual Residents Survey


More detail and information

Water Quality and Monitoring: There are a total of 38 routine chemical tests carried out on Christchurch water. 22 of these tests establish the presence of the specific chemical tested for, in order to be below measurable limits.

Energy is used more efficiently

Energy resources, whether renewable or non-renewable, are limited at any point in time. Christchurch as a whole is using ever increasing amounts of energy due to greater demand and consumption from a growing population.

Key points

  • Toal energy consumption has increased since 2009 by 7% to 31,500 terajoules. 
  • Between 2009 and 2016, the amount of energy consumed by each sector has remained relatively consistent, with only a small decline around 2011. Transport still represents the sector that consumes the most energy.
  • The amount of energy consumed by the transport sector has continually increased since 2009. This can likely be associated with increased transport activity in the city following the earthquakes.
  • Since the earthquakes energy consumption per capita has increased by around 6% to 85 giga joules per person in 2015. 
  • Although there were increases in the annual change per capita consumption in the 2012 to 2015 June years, 2016 has seen a small decline in the amount of energy consumed per capita.

Energy Consumption by Sector

Energy Consumption (Sector) graph

Source: Council, Christchurch Energy Database


Energy Consumption Per Capita

Energy Consumption Per Capita graph

Source: Council, Christchurch Energy Database


Annual Change in Per Capita Energy Consumption

Annual Change Energy Consumption graph

Source: Council, Christchurch Energy Database


More detail and information

Christchurch Energy Database: Statistics from Christchurch Agency for Energy Trust (CAfE) on how Christchurch uses energy.

We are prepared for climate change

Climate change has the potential to affect life across the four well-beings - social, cultural, environment and economic. However, the extent to which the effects will bring about challenges and opportunities remains largely subjective. 

Measures and more information for this outcome will be available at a later date. 

More detail and information

Climate Change Policy: Christchurch City Council's stance on climate change. 

Climate Change Projections: an overview of how the climate in the Canterbury region is likely to change into the future and what implications this may bring for the region.

A greater proportion of energy from renewable sources

Energy resources, whether renewable or non-renewable, are limited at any point in time. Christchurch as a whole is using ever increasing amounts of energy due to greater demand and consumption from a growing population. Much of Christchurch's energy is sourced from non-renewable fossil fuels. 

Key points

  • Renewable energy accounted for 33% of all energy used in 2016, compared with 38% in 2010.
  • Hydro energy is consistently the most widely used form of renewable energy, however the use of hydro energy declined between 2009 and 2012, before stabilising 9140 terajoules per year. 
  • Between 2009 and 2016, diesel use has increased from 6,900 to 9,900 tera joules, surpassing petrol in 2012 as the largest non-renewable energy source.
  • Greenhouse gas emissions from energy sources has increased by 17% since before the earthquakes, as a result of more diesel being used in the rebuild. 
  • Petrol and diesel are still the largest contributors to the city’s greenhouse gas emissions. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption have grown by 16% since 2008. 

Proportion of Renewable Energy

Proportion of Renewable Energy graph

Source: Council, Christchurch Energy Database


Total  Renewable Energy

Total  Renewable Energy graph

Source: Council, Christchurch Energy Database


Total Non-Renewable Energy

Total Non-Renewable Energy graph

Source: Council, Christchurch Energy Database


Per Capita Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Source: Council, Christchurch Energy Database


More detail and information

Sustainable Energy Strategy for Christchurch: Council's Sustainable Energy Strategy for Christchurch 2008-18 was the first comprehensive energy action plan to be adopted by a local authority in New Zealand.

Council Sustainability: Christchurch City Council is recognised, both in New Zealand and overseas, as a local authority committed to sustainable operations.