Recreation offers value to all parts of our communities and to all stages of life. It includes a range of leisure, cultural and sporting activities undertaken in a range of space and environments.

Increasing participation in recreation and sport

Physical activity promotes healthy lifestyles, personal happiness and a fitter and healthier community. Increasing participation in recreation and sporting activities will have a payback for our community through better, longer lives and reduced healthcare costs and issues. The Council is a key provider of recreation and sporting facilities and it is important the use and enjoyment of these facilities is maximised. 

Key points

  • People are using the Council swimming pools and recreation facilities less often than before the earthquakes. Since 2012 total visits have increased overall, but attendances still remain 27% lower than the number of visits in 2010; much of this is due to facilties closing down as a result of the earthquakes. 
  • Those who have not visited a CCC recreation and sport facility in the last 12 months has decreased from 66% in 2012 to 57% in 2014.
  • Between 2000 and 2010, the number of visitors to CCC recreation facilities increased by 122% from 2.1m to 4.7m visitors.
  • Post-earthquake, visitor numbers dropped by 40% for the two years ending June 2012. However numbers are showing positive recovery as the number of visits have increased to 3.4 million in 2016.

Frequency of Physical Activity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Quality of Life Survey(external link)


Frequency of Recreation Facility Visits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Council, Recreation & Sport Unit


Visits to Council Recreation Facilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Council, Recreation & Sport Unit


Visits to Recreation Facilities Per Capita

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Council, Recreation & Sport Unit; Statistics NZ


More detail and information

Canterbury Wellbeing Index(external link)The Canterbury Wellbeing Index tracks the progress of social recovery using indicators to identify emerging social trends and issues.

Equitable access to open space and community facilities

In order for people to provide for their social well-being and health, it is important that accessibility to recreational spaces and places is equally provided to all. Sport and recreation facilities should be designed to be inclusive and open to all and the use of the facilities kept affordable. 

Key points

  • From 2006 to 2016, the total area of open space has remained stable at around 9,900ha, as has the area of open space per 1000 people, showing positive recovery post-quake.
  • In March 2013, around 324,000 (89%) of the Christchurch usually resident population (UR population) lived within 500m of open space.
  • In 2014, 89% of respondents felt it is easy or very easy to access a local park or green space. The proportion of residents who felt it is difficult or very difficult has increased since 2008. 
  • Just over a quarter of residents live within a 10-15 minute walk of a library. 
  • In March 2013, around 4,200 UR population lived within 400m of a recreational facility and around 22,200 were within 800m. This equates to around 1% and 6% of the UR population, respectively.

Amount of Open Space

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Council, Zoning Information; Statistics NZ


Access to Open Space

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Council, Zoning Information; Statistics NZ


Perceived Access to Parks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Quality of Life Survey(external link)


Access to Libraries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Council, Libraries; Statistics NZ


More detail and information

The General Social Survey(external link): The New Zealand General Social Survey (NZGSS) provides information on the well-being of New Zealanders aged 15 years and over. 

The public has access to places of interest

Places of scenic, natural, heritage, cultural and educational interest enhance the City's distinctiveness and identity, and construct people's sense of place and belonging. Places of interest are wide ranging, and their value to the city may vary between individuals and groups. 

Key points

  • People's post-quake access to the natural environment, recreation, cultural and leisure facilities has improved considerably since 2012. 
  • The re-opening of Port Hills tracks and continual improvements to them has increased usage, e.g. Rapaki Track has approximately 220,000 users annually.
  • In 2016, 79% of people found it easy to access most or all of the natural features and landscapes they would like to visit, compared with over 80% pre-quakes.

  • The number of people who experienced no loss of access to Recreation, Cultural & Leisure Facilities has increased to 75% in 2016, an 11% improvement from September 2015.  


Loss of Access to the Natural Environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: CERA Wellbeing Survey(external link)


Loss of Access to Recreation, Cultural and Leisure Facilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: CERA Wellbeing Survey(external link)