Coastal Hazards Adaptation - Whakaraupō and Koukourarata

We want to hear from anyone and everyone who lives, works or plays in Whakaraupō-Lyttelton Harbour and Koukourarata-Port Levy about what you value in this beautiful area.

Project status: Open for feedback
Open for feedback: 25 October 2022 to 6 December 2022

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We have experienced around 20cm of sea level rise since 1995, and it is virtually certain that it will continue to rise over the 21st century. In Christchurch, we are anticipating a further 17-23cm of sea level rise by 2050, and 52cm-1m by 2100.

Adaptation planning(external link) is about preparing now, so that we are ready for what may happen in the future.  It involves communities, rūnanga and Council getting together to work out how coastal hazards are likely to impact communities, what options and adaption pathways are best for addressing these hazards, and how and when we need to act. It’s like having a map for a planned road trip, with different route options that we can take depending on the conditions we experience along the way. 

The first part of our adaptation planning journey for this area is to find out what’s important to you. We want to hear from anyone and everyone who lives, works or plays in Whakaraupō-Lyttelton Harbour and Koukourarata-Port Levy about what you value in this beautiful area. Your values will help us shape community objectives to ensure our planning is focused on the things that matter most to you and reflects your values and interests in the area.

We’re all in this together and we can all make a difference to how our future looks, even if it’s just small steps in the right direction. We have the responsibility, and the opportunity, to think about the world we want for our children and grandchildren.

Fill out our survey to let us know what you value(external link)

 

Come and talk to us

Come along to one of our events to talk about coastal hazards adaptation planning with the project team and ask any questions you might have.

Coastal flooding happens when normally dry, low-lying coastal areas are flooded by the sea. This usually happens as a result of a severe storm but rising sea levels could also cause ‘sunny day’ flooding from high tides.

Coastal erosion is a natural, ongoing process that occurs when the sea wears away the land. Some coastal areas experience short periods of erosion, but then recover (build up again) while others continuously erode and never recover. Coastal erosion may become more severe as a result of the impacts of climate change such as rising sea levels and increased storminess.

Rising groundwater can bring the water table closer to the ground surface. Near the coast, the level of the sea often influences groundwater levels. We can therefore expect to see the groundwater rising as sea levels rise. At its most extreme, groundwater could rise above ground level and cause temporary or permanent ponding of water.

Read more about coastal hazards

Our Christchurch coastal hazards interactive map(external link) lets you explore how different areas across the Christchurch District may be affected by coastal hazards.

Your values will help us develop community objectives to ensure our planning is focused on the things that matter most to you and reflects your values and interests in the area.

The Coastal Panel made up of community and rūnanga representatives will use your community objectives to develop high-level adaptation pathways which we’ll seek your feedback on next year. 

 Fill out our survey to let us know what you value(external link)

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Who to contact

Krystle Anderson,
Engagement Advisor

How the decision is made

  • Open for feedback